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Focaccia

 
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jerseymom
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Joined: 31 Dec 2004
Posts: 526
Location: usa

PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2005 3:18 pm    Post subject: Focaccia Reply with quote

Don't judge this focaccia by others you've eaten because this particular one deserves a place all its own... its delicate interior come from the fact that it is made with equal weights of potatoes and flour.


2 medium baking/starchy potatos (abt 1 pound)
1 cup milk, lukewarm
2 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
3 cups high gluten flour
2 tsps sea salt
10 - 12 leaves of fresh sage, finely chopped (I used rosemary)
6 Tbps extra-virgin olive oil (evoo), plus 2 Tbps for the pan and 1 or 2 Tbps for drizzling over the top (but I used 50% evoo and 50% olive oil)
1 1/2 to 2 tsps coarse sea salt



Boil the potatoes until they're cooked, immediately drain, peel, and mash them with fork, being careful to eliminate any lumps. Cool to room temp.

Dissolve the yeast in the milk, let it stand for 10 mins.

Mix the flour, potatos, 2 tsps fine sea salt, and the chopped herb together, add in dissolved yeast and evoo (little by little) and start to knead until the dough smooth, soft and elastic. Set it in an oiled bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled.

Brush olive oil on a 10.5 x 15.5-inch baking pan with 2-inch sides. Place the dough (don't knead... so as to save air bubbles inside) in the pan and gently press it out to the edges. With your hands moistened in oil, dimple the top, leaving small declivities for the oil. Sprinkle coarse salt crystals over the top. Cover with a kitchen cloth, set in a protected part of your kitchen where currents of air can't affect it, and let rise until half-doubled. Sprinkle a little more olive oil over the top.

At least 30 mins before you plan to bake, preheat the oven, with a baking stone inside, to 400F (200C). Place the baking pan directly on the stone and bake until the top and the underside are golden, abt 25 mins.
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giselle
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artchoo6
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Jerseymom, you're fast. Thank you very much for sharing this very nice recipe Very Happy. I've added it to my do-try list which is super long now, hee.
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Last edited by artchoo6 on Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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sinner
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Joined: 14 Jun 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jerseymom,

I am going to make this bread tomorrow morning. Just need to verify and ask a few silly questions (since I always read wrong). 6 Tbsp oil goes into the bread dough ? Are you able to tell me how much your 3 cups hg flour weighs? I usually don't like to measure my flour in cups because it all depends on how heavy handed we are. :roll:

I just read your introduction - it says equal amount of potato and flour, so if I use 1 pound of potato, must the flour be the same ?
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jerseymom
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Joined: 31 Dec 2004
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
6 Tbsp oil goes into the bread dough ?

Yes.
Quote:
how much your 3 cups hg flour weighs?

15oz or 450g
For potatos, since two medium potatos not always weight exactly 450g, just get the closest you can get.

sinner, your questions not silly at all, which actually help my recipe to straight out more details Smile
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sinner
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2005 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi jerseymom,

I need your expert eye to critic what I did. The focaccia turned out all right - it was not dense. Smile We liked the bread and I would give it another go when I am sure I got starchy potato . Thanks jerseymom.



Photo 1: I kneaded the bread with a breadmaker. I believe my potato was not a starchy one (got a new sack but no variety label on it), so the dough was very wet, I added 4-5 tbsp flour more but thought better not unbalance it as some dough is meant to be wet. But it did rise.

You specified 'coarse sea salt' , I found fine sea salt for the bread inner, but not coarse sea salt and the shop lady said to use "coarse rock salt" for the top instead island . I need to know whether sea salt is less salty than rock salt because our rock salt was very salty. I know I should have waited until I could find coarse sea salt but I wanted to try it out for the weekend.



Photo 2 : Does it look like too much salt, or is it the case of the rock salt being too coarse ? After pouring into the pan, I left it to rise to half but it seem to flatten on baking but it was not dense. Would the bread have been thicker, had the dough been not too wet ?
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2005 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey sinner,
Just judging the 2nd foto you did a great job, golden top crust and very porous interior... lets share our experience in here...

Quote:
I believe my potato was not a starchy one (got a new sack but no variety label on it)

but you could tell when you mashed them... the starchy one you able to break it with fork very easily.
(btw, take the potato out of water immediately when you turn the heat off, to avoid potato absorbing the water)
If you used non-starchy potato (i.e. with higher moisture content), then you should cut down the milk. But I wouldn't encourage anyway, I don't think it is easy in mashing.

Quote:
so the dough was very wet, I added 4-5 tbsp flour more but thought better not unbalance it as some dough is meant to be wet

I'd made this foccacia twice, by hand. My doughs were more wet than other bread dough, but not too bad. You know different potatos, flour, weather all sort can affect ...
This foccacia can be done by heavy-duty electric mixer (do you have one?), I will add into the recipe later. Hope that helps too.

Quote:
I need to know whether sea salt is less salty than rock salt because our rock salt was very salty.

sorry I haven't tasted rock salt ...
The size of the salt of mine dia. +/-2mm... same as yours? In here many food like bagels or preztels also put coarse salt on top, yes, they're pretty salty, but not killing.

Quote:
Photo 2 : Does it look like too much salt, or is it the case of the rock salt being too coarse ?

seems a bit too coarse... not too much to my hubby though.
You know some people (e.g. my hubby) just enjoy chewying coarse texture, if it's not important to you, I think you can use your own table salt, but don't follow the amount from the recipe as which will be too much for fine salt. Sprinkle herb, sun-dried tomato, etc on top to give the foccacia more attractive appearance then.

Quote:
I left it to rise to half but it seem to flatten on baking but it was not dense. Would the bread have been thicker, had the dough been not too wet ?

mine seemed not to rise further in the oven, nor sink neither. After came out from oven, it had abt 3cm thickness.

... oh phew... a long whine for me :lol: don't worry, your foccacia looks excellent. oh, I don't any "expert eye" except "4 eyes" *lol*
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connie
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2005 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Sinner & Giselle

I did not try your foccacia bread. However, I tried to make Potato bread which is baked in a square pan and pipe with custard on top. My bread rise but after baking it went flat. However, it was not hard and dense. Until now, I still dont know what went wrong too! Could it be the potato?

Rgds, Connie
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sinner
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2005 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi jerseymom,
It's always good to have someone cast their '4 eyes' Wink on a first attempt. Your answers have given me a bit more confidence in pursuing this focaccia further.

I use to make bread with my kenwood dough hooks but have always produced dense and not too satisfactory bread. Ever since I bought the breadmaker, all the bread have turned out great (less washing too-I am lazy :roll: ).

Like you suggested, next time I might sprinkle less salt and put other stuff on top.

Thank you for sharing Razz
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2005 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sinner,
You're welcome... heard bread machines always do wonderful job (still can feel the fuffliness of your herb loaf), will be a retirement gift to my hands somedays *hint to my hubby :twisted: *

connie,
In here potato bread (home- or commercial-made) its shape and structure are as nice as the white's. Would you like to post your recipe (plus photo if available) under a seperated topic, maybe our folks would like to try out or comment? Just an suggestion.
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giselle
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sinner
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2005 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jerseymom,

When I bought my h/duty kenwood some years back, my main aim was to make bread with it. I wish somebody then had raved on to me how good a breadmaker is.

I bought my basic breadmaker early this year - nowadays basic breadmakers are so cheap. When I was buying bread - I get a lot of complains - crumbly, uneven slices , this and that :twisted: . Now I don't buy bread anymore - so no more complains. I am not a bread person but because I add stuff to my sandwich and toast bread - it seem to be tastier and am now a bread convert. If you like crunchy toast, you will love the breadmaker bread. Smile . It says somewhere that if you churn out a specialty loaf at least once a week you will get your investment back within a year. It is healthier too as there are no additive. When we were buying bread, we would never buy or eat wholemeal or the high fibre healthy bread but now by slowly introducing and adding 'bran and different types of healthy seeds' we are used to it so our diet is healthier - no more white loaf except when hubby wants to make corn or smoked fish rolls then I make him a white loaf.

This sounds like a sales pitch Very Happy but I am such a convert that I rave on about it to anyone who will listen. :roll:

Yikes..... your hubby will tell you not to talk to me anymore Wink
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm lucky that an Italian bakery in my town can make wonderful bread; I go diy purely for my own interest. If one day I have enough fun, I think I just forget abt mixers and go for bread machines then Wink But of course, I'll purposely unconsciousely tuck your sales pitch in my hubby's wallet, kekee...
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sinner
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2005 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

:lol: :lol: Wink
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connie
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Made this yummy focaccia today! Agreed with Giselle... this one has a class of its own... Really good!

I omitted the coarse sea salt coz I dont have any. I put in mixed spice instead of sage.





Rgds, Connie
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2005 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

so beautiful your focccia! *drool* Nice job, connie!
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Linda
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is high gluten flour the same as bread flour?
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes, same Wink
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Linda
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Giselle

Thanks. Good. I have lots of that. Will try to make that this week end. My family loves eating it especially dipping it in olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
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coxiella
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Giselle,

I made your foccacia just now. True to your words, it has a class of it's own, the interior is truly soft, totally unlike those I've eaten before. But paisei that I 'dis-coloured' it too much Embarassed



I sprinkled some dried herbs and olives on top, so yummy Razz , couldn't stop myself from pinching a piece (tho it's already 9pm plus). O ya, I ran out of milk in my fridge :twisted: , so replaced with potato water from boiling the potatoes. The dough was pretty sticky, not sure it it's due to the potatoes (like Sinner's case) tho I used Russet :roll:
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Angie,
thanks for sharing the idea of using potato water. I remember many other similar recipes like to do so too.
Russet is the right type to use Very Happy
Yes, the dought is quite sticky... when I kneaded (and so felt) by hand, in the beginning the dough seemed just right, then turned very sticky. Don't be tempted to add too much flour as it would turn less sticky again... it's one of the difficult doughs to deal with for hand-kneading.
I see you did a great job in making the porous interior and attactive top! I'm glad you like it. But seem no one can get the coarse sea salt hor ...
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coxiella
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jerseymom wrote:

Yes, the dought is quite sticky... when I kneaded (and so felt) by hand, in the beginning the dough seemed just right, then turned very sticky. Don't be tempted to add too much flour as it would turn less sticky again... it's one of the difficult doughs to deal with for hand-kneading....

I did add a bit more flour and reduce the water slightly. Funny thing is, my KA cannot seem handle wetter/stickier doughs, coz they all stick to the sides and the dough hook can't do anything except just turn and turn island . I gave up and kneaded by hand too Smile , I didn't get it to be as smooth and elastic as those kneaded by KA, but it felt okay, glad it turned out good :lol: Think I have to learn to deal with sticky dough.

jerseymom wrote:
I see you did a great job in making the porous interior and attactive top! I'm glad you like it. But seem no one can get the coarse sea salt hor ...

Thanks for your kind words. I just had two BIG pcs for breakfast, toasted it slightly, still soft and yummy. I saw coarse sea salt at the supermarket, didn't get it coz it's quite a big pack, and dunno what else to use it for :roll: .
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jerseymom
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh right I don't think I can/should consume a big bag of salt, kekeee.. but I did finish a bag when used in roasting meat.
ppl here like to sprinkle coarse salt on big pretzel's, bagle's and bread stick's doughs as well.
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